Possibility: may, might, could

The word "possibility" means that something is possible, but other possible variants also exist. Possibility is expressed by the modal verbs MAY, MIGHT, COULD, with the meaning that the speaker thinks that something is possible, but doesn't know for sure and implies "maybe, perhaps".

Betty Azar in her book Understanding and Using English Grammar calls this meaning of the verbs MAY, MIGHT, COULD "less than 50% certainty"; that is, MAY, MIGHT, COULD are used to express a weak degree of certainty.

Examples:

Where is Mike?

He may be in the garden.

He might be in the attic.

He could be in the garage.

Why didn't he go to the party yesterday?

He may have been busy.

He might have been sick.

He could have been too tired to go to the party.

Compare: In the following examples the speaker thinks that something is highly probable: He must be in the garden. He must have been busy. (Strong probability is described in Strong Probability in the section Grammar.)

Meaning and context

The modal verbs MAY, MIGHT, COULD are very close synonyms in the meaning "possibility", though MAY expresses a bit stronger possibility than MIGHT or COULD. MAY and COULD have several meanings; MIGHT has only one meaning – possibility. (The verb MIGHT can be used in making a polite request in the same way as MAY, but MIGHT is rarely used in this meaning.)

As MAY and COULD have several meanings, it is important to know how to recognize the meaning in which they are used.

The context, as usual, is the most reliable means of recognizing the meaning of modal verbs in this or that situation. If the context is not clear enough, it may be difficult to understand in which meaning the modal verb is used. Look at these examples:

You may leave now. (permission)

He may leave for Rome soon. (possibility)

He may leave. (permission or possibility?)

Certain grammatical structures provide additional context and help us to understand the meanings of modal verbs. Quite often, the use of the infinitive BE after the modal verbs MAY and COULD is an indication that the meaning is "possibility". The perfect infinitive of the main verb after these modal verbs signals that the meaning is "possibility".

They may be at home.

You may be right.

He may have left already.

He could have been sleeping when I called him.

Tenses

The modal verbs MAY, MIGHT, COULD in the meaning "possibility" form two tenses: the present and the past.

The future is expressed by the present tense forms with the help of adverbs and adverbial phrases indicating the future time, e.g., "tomorrow, soon, next week".

Present tense

The present tense is formed by combining MAY, MIGHT, or COULD with one of the infinitive forms for the present tense: with the simple infinitive, the continuous infinitive, or the passive infinitive. The simple infinitive (active infinitive) is used more frequently. (Information on infinitive forms is given in Modal Verbs Introduction in the section Grammar.)

With simple / active infinitive:

She may be at home now.

He may leave for Rome soon.

He may not know my address.

It may rain in the evening.

He might be at the library.

She might ask him for help.

It might be difficult to do.

He might go there tomorrow.

He might not come back soon.

I don't know where he could be.

He could be at school or at home.

It could be John, but I can't see clearly.

With continuous infinitive:

They may be working now.

He might be sleeping now.

He could be sleeping now.

He could be playing tennis at the club at the moment.

With passive infinitive:

This work may be done tomorrow.

She might be offered a new job.

It could be done in a different way.

Past Tense

The past tense is formed by combining MAY, MIGHT, or COULD with one of the infinitive forms for the past tense: with the perfect infinitive, the perfect continuous infinitive, or the perfect passive infinitive. The perfect infinitive is used more frequently.

With perfect infinitive:

He may have been at home then.

She may have left already.

She may not have known his address.

He might have been at the bank.

He might not have come back yet.

He might have told her the truth.

I really don't know where he could have been last week.

It could have been John, but I'm not sure.

With perfect continuous infinitive:

She may have been walking her dog yesterday in the evening.

They might have been sleeping when she called them in the morning.

He could have been playing tennis at the club at that time.

With perfect passive infinitive:

It might have been done already.

He may have been offered a new job.

MAY and MIGHT in the past tense

Though MAY and MIGHT function as two separate modal verbs and have their own past forms (e.g., may have done, might have done), in certain cases MIGHT is used as the past form of MAY, for example, in reported speech according to the rules of the sequence of tenses. (See Sequence of Tenses in Reported Speech in the section Grammar.)

He said, "I may go there soon."

He said that he might go there soon.

She said, "I may have dropped my keys in the park."

She said that she might have dropped her keys in the park.

Also, only MIGHT is used to express supposition in conditional sentences with unreal condition, while both MAY and MIGHT are used to express possibility in sentences with real condition.

If he repaired his car, he might go to the lake with them tomorrow. (unreal condition referring to the present or future)

If he had repaired his car, he might have gone to the lake with them yesterday. (unreal condition referring to the past)

If he repairs his car, he may go to the lake with them tomorrow. (real condition referring to the future)

If he repairs his car, he might go to the lake with them tomorrow. (real condition referring to the future)

Note: COULD is also used in conditional sentences with unreal condition. (Unreal condition in conditional sentences is described in Conditional Sentences in the section Grammar and in the commentary to the song Megadeth - Trust in the section Hobby.)

Questions

MAY, MIGHT, COULD have differences in their use in questions. Usually, MAY and MIGHT in the meaning "possibility" are not used in questions. The substitute phrases "be likely; Is it possible; Are you sure" replace them in questions.

Is he likely to return soon?

Is she likely to be at home now?

Was he likely to tell Mike about it?

Is it possible that she is at home now?

Are you sure that he told Mike about it?

COULD doesn't have such restrictions and is used in questions, but sufficient context is needed to distinguish the meaning "possibility" from the other meanings of COULD. Compare:

Could you be more specific? (request)

Could he be lying to us about his past? (possibility)

Could you write a letter to her? (request)

Could he write in English when he was 15? (ability; here COULD is the past form of the verb CAN)

Could he have written this letter? (possibility)

Students often make mistakes in questions about the possibility of something. To avoid misunderstanding or mistakes, use the phrases "be likely; Is it possible; Are you sure" instead of MAY, MIGHT, COULD in questions or ask questions without the meaning "possibility".

Is she likely to know him?

Is it possible that she knows him?

Are you sure that she knows him?

Does she know him?

Is he likely to be there now?

Where is he now?

Where can I find him?

Negative statements

MAY and MIGHT are used in negative statements in the meaning that there is a possibility that some action might not take place.

He may not be home yet.

They may not have seen my letter.

It might not be true.

She might not know his address.

I might not have locked the door.

Note: Couldn't

COULD in the negative, usually in the combination "couldn't be" in the present and with the perfect infinitive of the main verb in the past, has the meaning "impossibility". "Can't" is used in the same way and in the same meaning. ("Couldn't" is a little milder). "Couldn't" and "can't" in this meaning indicate that the speaker strongly believes that something is really impossible.

It couldn't be true! / It can't be true!

It couldn't have been true! / It can't have been true!

Anton couldn't be lying to us. He is an honest man.

He couldn't have taken the money! / He can't have taken the money!

It couldn't have been Tom. Tom was in Chicago last week.

Is this a joke? You can't be serious!

Combinations with "have to" and "be able to"

MAY and MIGHT are used in combinations with "have to" and "be able to".

He may have to move to another city soon.

She might have to sell her apartment.

He might be able to help you.

They might not be able to come to the party tomorrow.

He might have been able to solve this problem.

Substitutes

The adverbs "maybe, perhaps" and the phrase "It is possible that" are simple and useful substitutes for the modal verbs of this group.

Maybe he's still at home.

Maybe he was really sick yesterday.

Maybe he will tell us about it.

Maybe she didn't go there.

Perhaps he'll come back.

It's possible that she doesn't know them.

Recommendations

Use the modal verbs MAY and MIGHT in the meaning "possibility" in affirmative and negative statements referring to the present, past, or future. The verb MIGHT is easier to use than MAY or COULD.

Вероятность: may, might, could

Слово possibility (вероятность, возможность) значит, что что-то вероятно / возможно, но другие возможные варианты также существуют. Вероятность выражается модальными глаголами MAY, MIGHT, COULD, со значением, что говорящий думает, что что-то возможно, но не знает наверное и подразумевает «может быть, возможно».

Betty Azar в своей книге Understanding and Using English Grammar называет это значение глаголов MAY, MIGHT, COULD «меньше 50% уверенности»; то есть MAY, MIGHT, COULD используются для выражения слабой степени уверенности.

Примеры:

Где Майк?

Возможно, он в саду.

Возможно, он на чердаке.

Возможно, он в гараже.

Почему он не пошёл на вечеринку вчера?

Возможно, он был занят.

Возможно, он был болен.

Возможно, он слишком устал, чтобы идти на вечеринку.

Сравните: В следующих примерах говорящий думает, что что-то очень вероятно: He must be in the garden. He must have been busy. (Должно быть, он в саду. Наверное, он был занят.) (Большая вероятность описывается в материале Strong Probability в разделе Grammar.)

Значение и контекст

Модальные глаголы MAY, MIGHT, COULD очень близкие синонимы в значении «вероятность», хотя MAY выражает немного более сильную вероятность, чем MIGHT или COULD. MAY и COULD имеют несколько значений; MIGHT имеет только одно значение – вероятность. (Глагол MIGHT может употребляться в обращении с вежливой просьбой таким же образом как MAY, но MIGHT редко употребляется в этом значении.)

Поскольку MAY и COULD имеют несколько значений, важно знать, как узнавать значение, в котором они употреблены.

Контекст, как всегда, самое надёжное средство для узнавания значения модальных глаголов в той или иной ситуации. Если контекст недостаточно ясный, может быть трудно понять, в каком значении употреблен модальный глагол. Посмотрите на эти примеры:

Вы можете уйти сейчас. (разрешение)

Он может уехать в Рим скоро. (вероятность)

Он может уйти. (разрешение или вероятность?)

Определённые грамматические конструкции обеспечивают дополнительный контекст и помогают нам понять значения модальных глаголов. Весьма часто, употребление инфинитива BE после модальных глаголов MAY и COULD служит указанием, что значение «вероятность». Перфектный инфинитив основного глагола после этих модальных глаголов сообщает, что значение «вероятность».

Возможно, они дома.

Возможно, вы правы.

Он, может быть, уже уехал.

Может быть, он спал, когда я позвонил ему.

Времена

Модальные глаголы MAY, MIGHT, COULD в значении «вероятность» образуют два времени: настоящее и прошедшее.

Будущее время выражается формами настоящего времени с помощью наречий и наречных сочетаний, указывающих будущее время, например, «завтра, скоро, на следующей неделе».

Настоящее время

Настоящее время образуется соединением MAY, MIGHT или COULD с одной из форм инфинитива для настоящего времени: с простым инфинитивом, продолженным инфинитивом или пассивным инфинитивом. Простой инфинитив (активный инфинитив) употребляется более часто. (Информация о формах инфинитива дана в статье Modal Verbs Introduction в разделе Grammar.)

С простым / активным инфинитивом:

Она может быть дома сейчас.

Он может уехать в Рим скоро.

Он может не знать мой адрес.

Может пойти дождь вечером.

Он может быть в библиотеке.

Она может попросить его о помощи.

Это может быть трудно сделать.

Он может пойти туда завтра.

Он может не скоро вернуться.

Я не знаю, где он может быть.

Он может быть в школе или дома.

Это может быть Джон, но я не вижу ясно.

С продолженным инфинитивом:

Возможно, они сейчас работают.

Возможно, он спит сейчас.

Возможно, он спит сейчас.

Он, возможно, играет в теннис в клубе в данный момент.

С пассивным инфинитивом:

Возможно, эта работа будет сделана завтра.

Возможно, ей предложат новую работу.

Возможно, это может быть сделано по-другому.

Прошедшее время

Прошедшее время образуется соединением MAY, MIGHT или COULD с одной из форм инфинитива для прошедшего времени: с перфектным инфинитивом, перфектным продолженным инфинитивом или перфектным пассивным инфинитивом. Перфектный инфинитив употребляется более часто.

С перфектным инфинитивом:

Он, возможно, был дома тогда.

Она, возможно, уже уехала.

Она, возможно, не знала его адреса.

Он, возможно, был в банке.

Он, возможно, ещё не вернулся.

Он, возможно, сказал ей правду.

Я действительно не знаю, где он мог быть на прошлой неделе.

Это мог быть Джон, но я не уверен.

С перфектным продолженным инфинитивом:

Может быть, она выгуливала свою собаку вчера вечером.

Они, возможно, спали, когда она позвонила им утром.

Он, возможно, играл в теннис в клубе в то (самое) время.

С перфектным пассивным инфинитивом:

Это, возможно, уже было сделано.

Ему, возможно, предложили новую работу.

MAY и MIGHT в прошедшем времени

Хотя MAY и MIGHT работают как два отдельных модальных глагола и имеют свои собственные формы прошедшего времени (например, may have done, might have done), в определённых случаях MIGHT используется как форма прошедшего времени для MAY, например, в косвенной речи согласно правилам согласования времён. (См. Sequence of Tenses in Reported Speech в разделе Grammar.)

Он сказал: «Я, возможно, скоро пойду туда».

Он сказал, что он, возможно, скоро пойдёт туда.

Она сказала: «Я, возможно, уронила свои ключи в парке».

Она сказала, что она, возможно, уронила свои ключи в парке.

Также, только MIGHT используется для выражения предположения в условных предложениях с нереальным условием, в то время как и MAY и MIGHT используются для выражения вероятности в предложениях с реальным условием.

Если бы он починил свою машину, он мог бы поехать на озеро с ними завтра. (нереальное условие, относящееся к настоящему или будущему)

Если бы он починил свою машину, он мог бы поехать на озеро с ними вчера. (нереальное условие, относящееся к прошедшему)

Если он починит свою машину, он может поехать на озеро с ними завтра. (реальное условие, относящееся к будущему)

Если он починит свою машину, он может поехать на озеро с ними завтра. (реальное условие, относящееся к будущему)

Примечание: COULD тоже употребляется в условных предложениях с нереальным условием. (Нереальное условие в условных предложениях описывается в материале Conditional Sentences в разделе Grammar и в комментарии к песне Megadeth - Trust в разделе Hobby.)

Вопросы

MAY, MIGHT, COULD имеют различия в употреблении в вопросах. Обычно, MAY и MIGHT в значении «вероятность» не употребляются в вопросах. Фразы-заменители "be likely (быть вероятным, похожим); Is it possible; Are you sure" заменяют их в вопросах.

Вероятно ли / Похоже ли, что он скоро вернется?

Вероятно ли / Похоже ли, что она сейчас дома?

Вероятно ли, что он сказал Майку об этом?

Вероятно ли / Возможно ли, что она сейчас дома?

Вы уверены, что он сказал Майку об этом?

COULD не имеет таких ограничений и употребляется в вопросах, но требуется достаточный контекст, чтобы отличить значение «вероятность» от других значений COULD. Сравните:

Не могли бы вы (сказать) конкретнее? (просьба)

Не может ли быть, что он нам лжет о своем прошлом? (вероятность)

Не могли бы вы написать ей письмо? (просьба)

Мог / Умел он писать по-английски, когда ему было 15? (способность; здесь COULD – форма прошедшего времени глагола CAN)

Мог ли он написать это письмо? (вероятность)

Студенты часто делают ошибки в вопросах о вероятности чего-то. Чтобы избежать неправильного понимания или ошибок, употребите фразы "be likely; Is it possible; Are you sure" вместо MAY, MIGHT, COULD в вопросах или задавайте вопросы без значения «вероятность».

Вероятно ли, что она знает его?

Возможно ли, что она знает его?

Вы уверены, что она знает его?

Знает ли она его?

Похоже ли, что он сейчас там?

Где он сейчас?

Где я могу его найти?

Отрицательные повествовательные предложения

MAY и MIGHT употребляются в отрицательных повествовательных предложениях в значении, что есть вероятность, что какое-то действие не произойдёт.

Его может ещё не быть дома.

Возможно, они не видели моего письма.

Возможно, это неправда.

Возможно, она не знает его адреса.

Возможно, я не запер дверь.

Примечание: Couldn't

COULD в отрицательной форме, обычно в сочетании "couldn't be" в настоящем времени и с перфектным инфинитивом основного глагола в прошедшем времени, имеет значение «невозможность / невероятность». "Can't" употребляется таким же образом и в том же значении. ("Couldn't" немного мягче.) "Couldn't" и "can't" в этом значении указывают, что говорящий сильно верит, что что-то действительно невозможно.

Это не может быть правдой!

Это не могло быть правдой! / Это не могло быть правдой!

Не может быть, что Антон лжет нам. Он честный человек.

Не может быть, что он взял деньги! / Не может быть, что он взял деньги!

Это не мог быть Том. Том был в Чикаго на прошлой неделе.

Это шутка? Не может быть, что вы говорите это серьёзно!

Сочетания с "have to" и "be able to"

MAY и MIGHT употребляются в сочетаниях с "have to" и "be able to".

Возможно, ему придётся переехать в другой город скоро.

Возможно, ей придётся продать её квартиру.

Возможно, он сможет помочь вам.

Возможно, они не смогут прийти на вечеринку завтра.

Возможно, он смог решить эту проблему.

Заменители

Наречия "maybe, perhaps" (может быть, возможно) и фраза "It is possible that" – простые и полезные заменители для модальных глаголов этой группы.

Может быть, он всё ещё дома.

Может быть, он был действительно болен вчера.

Может быть, он расскажет нам об этом.

Может быть, она не ходила туда.

Возможно, он вернётся.

Возможно, что она не знает их.

Рекомендации

Употребите модальные глаголы MAY и MIGHT в значении «вероятность» в утвердительных и отрицательных повествовательных предложениях, относящихся к настоящему, прошедшему или будущему. Глагол MIGHT легче в употреблении, чем MAY или COULD.

Modal verbs and substitutes expressing possibility: may, might, could.

Модальные глаголы и заменители, выражающие небольшую вероятность: may, might, could.